Thursday, May 26, 2005

Egypt's election fights [So this is how Mubarak keeps power...]


Egyptian supporters from the ruling National Democratic party clash with a protester from the opposition Kifaya, or 'Enough' movement, center, during a rally in down town Cairo Wednesday, May 25, 2005. President Hosni Mubarak urged Egyptians to support a national referendum Wednesday that would clear the way for Egypt's first multi-candidate presidential elections. Critics consider the referendum a sham, saying the rules being laid down ensure Mubarak will have no serious challengers and that his ruling National Democratic Party will not lose its grip on power. (AP Photo)



Egyptian supporters from the ruling National Democratic party clash with a protester from the opposition Kifaya, 'enough' movement, center, during a rally in down town Cairo Wednesday, May 25, 2005. President Hosni Mubarak urged Egyptians to support a national referendum Wednesday that would clear the way for Egypt's first multi-candidate presidential elections. Critics consider the referendum a sham, saying the rules being laid down ensure Mubarak will have no serious challengers and that his ruling National Democratic Party will not lose its grip on power. (AP Photo)



Egyptian supporters of the National democratic party burn banners of the Kifaya 'Enough' movement after their clash in Cairo Wednesday, May 25, 2005. Police and plainclothes security men beat up groups of demonstrators opposed to President Hosni Mubarak and the constitutional changes he urged Egyptians to support Wednesday in a national referendum that would clear the way for Egypt's first multi-candidate presidential elections. (AP Photo/ Nasser Nouri)


Egyptian supporters from the National democratic party flash Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak posters to other protesters from the Kifaya 'Enough' movement, front, during a rally in Cairo Wednesday, May 25, 2005. Police and plainclothes security men beat up groups of demonstrators opposed to President Hosni Mubarak and the constitutional changes he urged Egyptians to support Wednesday in a national referendum that would clear the way for Egypt's first multi-candidate presidential elections. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)



An Egyptian man, a supporter of the left-wing umbrella organization Kefaya (Enough), is arrested by policemen in civilian clothes for participating in a protest against the referendum on changing the electoral system to allow for a competitive presidential race.(AFP/Cris Bouroncle)



Supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak fight with a member of Kifaya ' enough' movement, center, during a rally in Cairo Wednesday, May 25, 2005. Oposing groups clashed Wednesday with police and plainclothes security men beat up groups of demonstrators opposed to President Hosni Mubarak and the constitutional changes he urged Egyptians to support Wednesday in a national referendum that would clear the way for Egypt's first multi-candidate presidential elections. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)



Supporters of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak chant 'Long live Egypt, long live Mubarak!' as they stage a rally near a polling station in Cairo. Egyptians trickled into polling stations to vote on a key electoral change to allow contested presidential polls for the first time.(AFP/Cris Bouroncle)



Kefaya (Enough) protest movement members protest as riot police barricade them in Cairo May 25, 2005. Plainclothes supporters of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak beat up activists protesting against a referendum on Wednesday on a new presidential election system that allows opposition candidates but sets them high hurdles. REUTERS/Mona Sharaf



Egyptian supporters from the ruling National Democratic party, right, fight with supporters from the Kifaya, or ' Enough' movement, during a rally in downtown Cairo Wednesday, May 25, 2005. President Hosni Mubarak urged Egyptians to vote in Wednesday's referendum on constitutional changes that would clear the way for the nation's first multi-candidate presidential elections. Critics consider the referendum a sham. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)



An Egyptian woman screams as she and other members of the left-wing umbrella organization Kefaya (Enough) are roughed-up by supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak while participating in a protest in Cairo against the referendum on changing the electoral system.(AFP/Cris Bouroncle)